test-taking

Take the Test from the Inside (Part II)

Predict what will be on the exam

So, you’ve got good study notes with good questions and killer summaries, and the exam is looming. You’re good to go, right? One more thing. Predict what’s going to be on the test.

I mean, why gamble? Why let it be a surprise? Predicting the test questions is usually pretty easy to do. Look over the syllabus, which is the design of the course. Review what has been discussed in class. Ask yourself, “What has this professor been emphasizing?” Role-play, pretend you’re the professor: what questions would you put on the test? To make sure your predictions are sound, ask the professor outright: “Yo, Teach, what’s gonna be on the test?” (If you really say “Yo, Teach,” though, I won’t answer for what happens to you.) But before you ask, do make your own predictions. Then after you ask and the professor answers, see how accurate your predictions were. This is another study technique: predict and discover—it tunes your analytical skills. If you make the effort to think about and forecast what the professor is going to put on the test and only then ask, you’ll better understand the answers you get and the implications of what’s going to be on the exam because you’ll already have thought about it yourself. Even if the teacher contradicts one or more of your predictions, it still won’t be news to you; you will be intellectually comparing inaccurate conclusions with accurate information, which is an excellent way to learn. Want to do extremely well on tests? Get on the same page as the professor; develop the facility of being able to think like the professor when you need to, as well as the discipline of thinking for yourself all the time.

The actual studying for the test is now easy. Return to your notes (see Part I). Cover up the answers and summary, and quiz yourself by reading and thinking about the left-column questions you wrote. Next, write new summaries and compare them to the old ones. If you study with one or more friends, together try to come up with questions that draw forth the most complex, complete answers, and summaries that explain the most both briefly and elegantly.

When at last you sit down to take the exam, you will have already thoroughly explored every corner of it. You might feel nervous going in, but when you begin to see questions that are just differently worded versions of questions you yourself have asked and answered, questions that you accurately predicted would be here, the jitters will fly away and you will feel at home. Take the test from the inside. It’s easier.

Everything suggested here is just what any good cat burglar does all the time. You want the ginormous diamond in the laser-guarded museum? Tirelessly case the joint for months, leave no blueprint unexamined, gather exactly the right equipment, and practice doing the job. Is it hard work? What’s it worth to you?
 

The Pink Panther

Take the Test from the Inside, Part I

Powerful study techniques and the art of higher-order questioning.

Here’s an oldie-but-goodie note-taking system1 that works especially well for a course that has exams.

Draw a line vertically down the page so that one third of the page is on the left and two thirds are on the right. Also draw a horizontal line across the page about a quarter of the way up from the bottom. You can also buy notebooks that are configured this way.


Note-taking sections

In class, take notes on the right side, in the right column. After class it’s best to review and, more important, continue your notes the same day if possible, when they’re fresh. It’s the follow-up work on your notes that will make the difference when it comes time to study for exams.

The first follow-up step is to write in the left column a question to which the note on the right is the answer. For example, let’s say you took notes on Freud’s definitions of id, ego, and superego. Next to the definition of id (in the left column), you could write, “What is the id?” But there are other questions you could write that would help you more. You want to come up with questions that stimulate you to think about the concept rather than simply retrieve factual data like a computer. Questions that begin with “How” work well, because they ask you to think about process and coming-into-being and cause & effect. “Describe the relationship between…” is another good way to begin questions, as is “What does x have to do with y?”

But exams often ask for definitions, so why not write: “What is Freud’s definition of the id?” Well, you can, but then you’ll be relying on brute force memorization (and for memorizing, flash cards are probably more useful than discursive notes). By contrast, the question “What is the relationship between the id and the superego?” is asking you to think about more than one thing:

  • the definition of id
  • the definition of superego
  • the attitude of the superego in relation to the id, and vice versa
  • how the id and superego function
  • what each is like metaphorically (and here you can get creative: the id is like Cookie Monster or Caligula, while the superego is like the sanctimonious angel on my shoulder or my fourth grade teacher)

… And many more subtle things. Process and relationship questions are higher-order in the sense that they implicate multiple layers of meaning, not just one-to-one labels (e.g. “The id is the primitive part of the mind that seeks sensual pleasure and violence for their own sake” is a simplistic this-equals-that formulation). Higher-order questions develop complete pictures of concepts in interconnected webs. In short, coming up with good questions requires solid understanding of the concepts in the first place, and those same questions will promote solid understanding later on when you’re studying for exams.

After you’ve written questions in the left column for your notes that are in the right column, it’s time to summarize on the bottom of the page. Cover up your notes and questions and explain the main ideas with as much intellectual oomph in as few words as possible. This is one way to tell whether your left-column questions are really useful: when you understand the material well enough to ask good questions, you’ll be able to summarize the material confidently. These are your rules of thumb for studying: if you can’t think of higher-order questions and you have trouble writing a summary, you haven’t grasped the concepts sufficiently; when you can ask the questions and when you can give a summary lecture and teach the concepts, you’ve mastered the material.

Now you’re prepared for the exam! In fact, you’re prepared in more ways than you may be aware of. In Part II you will learn how to predict what’s going to be on the exam.


  1. Based on the “Cornell Notes” system, devised in the 1950s by Dr. Walter Pauk of Cornell University. 

7 Weird but Effective Test Anxiety Busters

Even people who are well prepared for exams can suffer from test anxiety. Symptoms can include loss of self-confidence, restlessness, feelings of dread, impaired concentration, shortness of breath, tension in shoulders and neck, clenched jaw, gnashing of teeth, tearing of hair, rending of clothes, temporarily wishing one had never been born, and sudden conversion either to a redemption-oriented religious cult or to existential nihilism.

Fortunately, there are several techniques you can use to alleviate test anxiety. Don’t rend your clothes or join a cult. Instead, the next time you feel anxious about a test…

  1. Chew gum during the test. Research at Baylor College of Medicine suggests it may help test performance and concentration, and, though the jury is still deliberating on this, it’s certainly worth the dollar or whatever it costs now for a stick of gum. Some folks with AD/HD–associated symptoms find that gum chewing is a kind of subtle fidgeting that helps them focus. I know a student who swears by this.

  2. When you are sitting at your desk, grip the bottom of the chair with your hands (making sure to watch out for wads of discarded gum from your fellow nervous test-takers). Pull up with your hands as you push down with the rest of your body, creating tension in your shoulders and arms. Hold for a couple of seconds, and then completely release. Do this a few times.

  3. With your chin slightly tucked to lengthen the back of your neck, gently roll your head, and move your jaw up and down and back and forth a few times.

  4. If you really start to freak out, put your pen down and do this eye exercise: without moving your head and with your eyes open, move your eyeballs as far up as you can, then as far down as you can. Repeat over and over at a fairly rapid and regular pace until you feel just a little woozy, and then close your eyes, take a deep breath, and rest for a few seconds. Repeat until you feel a sense of calm. You can also do this by looking ahead at the place where the wall meets the ceiling, then at the place where the floor meets the ceiling, and so on. This is a technique from EMDR that has a very calming effect on feelings of panic or anxiety.

  5. If you suddenly feel like your mind has gone blank, don’t fight it. Actually make your mind go blanker. Put your pen down, close your eyes, and focus on the darkness of nothing. Clear a space in your mind, like an empty room. Rest there for a few moments. When you open your eyes, if your mind is still blank, move on to another question, while saying to yourself  “An empty mind is clear and ready.” Trust that your subconscious is indeed working behind the scenes to help you retrieve the information you need while you go on to other questions.

  6. When you first sit down to take the test, spend a minute doing some deep breathing. Place one hand between the bottom of your ribcage and your belly button, and place the other hand on your back, opposite the first hand. Inhale deeply through your nose into both hands, and exhale fully through your mouth in a natural, slow rhythm. Feel each breath expand your stomach and your back with each inhalation, and deflate them with each exhalation. Notice how this feels. If you become anxious during the exam, your breathing will probably have become shallow, rapid, and located high in your chest. Just put your hands on your stomach and back and let your breath settle down again. One variation you can try is to hold the breath for a few seconds after each inhalation for as long as you feel comfortable doing so without straining at all, and then exhale again. You’ll feel your breath become stronger and your energy replenish.

  7. Repeat silently to yourself:

    I’m smart
    I’m capable
    I know more than I think I do.

     

Go Fish in
Streams of Consciousness:

absenceacceptanceaccomplishmentADHDaimsanalysisannotationanxietyAPAappearanceappleappreciationargumentartistaskingattachmentattentionawarenessBatmanbeingblank mindblissboatboring!brainstormingbraverycandlescenter of gravitychoicechoosing collegecognitioncommunicationcompassionconclusionconfidenceconsciousnessconversationcreative writingcreativitydawdlingdiagnosisdoorsdramadreamdrinkingecologyemotionenergyessaysessentialevidenceexamexcitementexecutive functionexerciseexperienceexpositionfailurefearfeelingfightfigurationflowfootballfrederick douglassfreewritinggamegedankenexperimentgesturegetting startedgoalgrammarhappinesshealinghearthonorhopehumanideasimaginationimagination_exerciseimplexinnovationinspirationinstinctinterestjubileekinestheticknifeknowledgelogicloudlovemagicmanagemasterymeaningmechanicsmedicationmeditationmetacognitionmilitarymindmistakesMLAmothermotivationmountainnontraditional collegenote-takingnotesorganizeout-of-the-boxparticipationpartspassionpatiencepeak-experiencepedagogyperseverancepersistencephysicalizeplanplayingplaywrightingplotpoetrypositive pointingpre-writingpreferenceprepositionpresenceprioritiesprocessprocrastinationprofessorsproofreadingputteringquestionsreadingrealityreflectionrelationshiprelaxationrepresentationreservesresourcesresponseresponsibilityrevisingsanctuaryself-actualizationself-assessmentself-relianceseptembershort storysocratic methodsoulspacestorystrengthsstressstudyingsuccesssummariessynthesistalkingtasksteachingtechniquetest anxietytest-takingThanksgivingthemethesisthinkingtimetolerancetomorrowtreetrusttruthunderstandingveteransvisualizationvoicewaldorfwelcomewholewillwillpowerwomenwordsworkingwriter's blockwritingyearningyesterday

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